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Austin Shepard DVD, Get To The Winners Circle

January 16th, 2019 by nikki garrett

To win in the sport of Cutting, you need to have a trained cow horse! Six-million dollar winner Austin Shepard is the man to teach you how to do this. Buy his DVD to learn how to teach your horse to work a cow. Click here to purchase your own DVD Now! 

 

 


Man On Fire – Clay Volmer

November 19th, 2018 by Nevada Huffman

After just four years of competing in the Snaffle Bit Futurity, Clay Volmer sent the crowd wild with his scorching fence run that saw him take out the 2018 Intermediate Championship at the Will Rogers, Fort Worth on SDP HY Rey Bound.

“I had told people for months, if I get into the finals, it’s going to look like my hair is going to be on fire because we are going to go fast,” he said.

Clay Volmer

“I knew it was good when I got done. It was one of those deals when you’re in the moment and you’re going as fast as you can possibly go and be as accurate as you can possibly be. It was fun and being in the Will Rogers where everybody was just screaming. After the first turn I couldn’t hear anything, it was so loud,” he said reliving the moment.

Clay, who has spent most of his career training cutters, made the transition to working cow horses after a family member asked him to train a horse for that event in 2015.

“It was a big learning curve for me coming straight from cutting. It was real hard but she was a nice horse,” said Clay. With help from cow horse trainers Chris Dawson and Boyd Rice, Clay made the Limited Finals in his first year at the Snaffle Bit Futurity in Reno. Then in 2016, he won the Limited Snaffle Bit title on Hesa Royalena.

“That was completely mind-blowing you know. I didn’t have any idea that was a possibility even,” he said of his win. He then won all three levels (open, int and limited) at the Pre Futurity in 2017.

Originally from South Dakota, Clay started out rodeoing as a bareback rider. He then moved into starting colts for Larry Gonzalez in Texas which were cutting horses. Clay said he didn’t know anything about cutting but soon got a quick introduction. “It was the only place in the world that I felt like I can get paid to ride super nice horses. I feel like it was a plan you know.”

He went on to work for Greg Wright, Tom Lyons, Brody Whitman and Chad Bushaw before spending five years working at Rick Smith’s in Paradise Tx and training outside horses. “Getting to see horses broke to a whole new level than what I’d ever seen, that was real fun for me,” he said of the trainers he spent time with.

Clay Volmer – Snaffle Bit Futurity

Clay agreed that his relatively fast success in the cow horse industry was mainly due to his foundation in cutting. He said he was glad his journey led him to cutting first. “I feel like if I hadn’t been through the cutting deal first, I would have been extremely lost in that [working cow horse industry] so I feel like going through the cutting horse world was a brilliant beginning,” Clay said.

Working cow horses must compete in three events, reining, snaffle bit cutting and fence work.

Clay rides about 25-30 horses a day. He still has some cutting horses, but said he has to limit the number of horses in his barn to ensure he gets enough time to ride them. “I created a business model where a certain number of horses is where I feel I can do the best job possible for the client and the horse.” “It’s a very long day and very demanding,” he added.

Besides the obvious differences in the events, Clay said the biggest change he needed to make from cutting was the way he approached competition.

“In the cow horse deal, the first thing those guys taught me is to never give up. In the cutting, if your horse misses a cut in the aged events you’re probably out, it’s time to go home you know…in the cow horse, you have maybe a little hiccup in one event and still be extremely successful in another and can still make the finals, then it’s a clean slate,” said Clay. When it comes to horses, Clay said cow horses have got to be allrounders, they’ve got to have all the attributes of cutters and be able to run. It’s a combination Hy Rey Bound has he said. Owned by Buffalo Ranch, the horse was in Paul Hansma’s barn, who called Clay and said he needed to look at Hy Rey Bound for the snaffle bit.

“He’s an athlete, I mean he’s an extreme athlete. He doesn’t care. The horse loves it. You can run that horse as fast as he can possibly go and he will stop so hard, like he tries to fling you over his head. There’s nothing not to like,” Clay said glowingly. Clay said he had a good feeling going into the final.

“I kind of called on him and I knew that he would be there for me and I just really wanted to show everybody what kind of cool horse he is.”

Clay said he now has his sights set on winning the Open Snaffle Bit Futurity.


The RealCow Training System

August 25th, 2018 by Simone Cobb

With a degree in Biosystems Engineering from Clemson University, an old remote control car and four years of tweaking, Billy Weir developed the RealCow Training System, which does everything but moo and poop!

Like all good inventions, Realcow was born out of necessity. A cutting horse trainer based in South Carolina, Weir had used almost every type of mechanical cow on the market, but said they were limited and he needed something better.

“Where I live it’s hard to get a good supply of cattle,” Weir said. “English-bred cattle are slow moving and hard to train a horse on and I wanted to make a machine that would make up for the slack.”

Weir claims one of the benefits that differentiates the RealCow from other machines is its unpredictability for the horse which is what happens when working live cattle. Unlike traditional mechanical cows which are attached to a rope or a track and move on the same line, the RealCow uses a rubber track system that work like wheels that can be moved anywhere over the arena.

“It puts different pressure on the horse on all different angles that other cows can’t do, like a real cow,” said Weir’s training client, Monty Nix. “It’s the most realistic thing I’ve ever worked to [simulate] a cow, out of everything out there nowadays.”

Along with its resemblance to a real cow in both looks and movement, Weir says that it’s most beneficial because of its versatility.

“I can run it anywhere,” says Weir. “The horse connects with it better than other machines because it’s not in one place.”

Weir developed the RealCow to help amateurs and non pros that weren’t practiced at working live cattle. But it’s also a highly effective training device for pros and giving lessons.

“The Real Cow is an amazing tool for both horse and rider, and it allows me to take my training sessions to a whole new level,”

said Weir’s training client, Kaylyn Huggins. “I get the ability to feel as if I’m working a live cow, but in a controlled setting. It allows me to truly focus on myself and my horse while still getting the same feel from him as if we’re working a live cow. The RealCow has allowed my horse and I to improve tremendously and grow as a team.”

Weir says that the RealCow is great for horses of all ages and stages of equine sports from two- year-olds to horses with problems and works well for all levels of riders.

“The horse I am riding now was a serious struggle for me, initially, to connect with him,” said RealCow user Becky Huggins. “Any confidence I had with my previous horse was gone and I felt like I was starting from scratch. The RealCow is what really helped build my confidence with this new horse. Because it looks like a real cow, there is no question about where my horse and I need to be in relation to the cow which is super important when working live cattle.”

The RealCow made its first debut at the 2017 Derby, now, Weir’s current goals are getting everyone to try it.

“It’s worked great with my program and I’ve been successful with it,” said Weir. “I think all other products are great, but the horse reacts to it better because it’s worked in different spots.”

The RealCow is worked with a handheld remote and the RealCow’s battery can work 20 head of horses on a single charge. The cow can also be easily transported.

“The RealCow’s mobility also allows us to work in different places and in different directions,” said Becky. “When you go to shows, no two arenas are exactly the same and it really helps to change it up a bit so the horse and I are able to easily adjust and further my confidence in the pen.”

The RealCow is different to other mechanical systems by adding pressure to the horse coming at and going away from them.

“The Real Cow is a versatile, easy to use training tool that has proven to produce amazing results,” said Kaylyn. “I am truly grateful for what Billy Weir and the RealCow Training System has down for myself and my horse.”

For more information on the RealCow, visit: www.realcowtraining.com


Cutting’s $8-Million Man Shares His Tips & Tactics In The Show Pen!

June 13th, 2015 by CHTO

While he mightn’t actually be bionic, Phil Rapp’s track history in cutting certainly suggests something super human when it comes to winning events!
As the top money earner in the history of the sport, more than $8.4-million to date, Phil has truly spent his life showing and training cutting horses.
He recently shared this vast experience with around 25 amateurs and non-pros at an NCHA Cutting Academy clinic in Fort Smith, Arkansas sponsored by Waco Bend.
Phil zeroed in on rider’s skills in the herd, and emphasized the importance of driving forward for decisive cuts.
Phil revealed many gems including:
•  How to clear the herd on your cut
•  Why you need to use two hands sometimes to get a square stop
•  Why, if you’re having trouble on one side of the arena, it’s probably because of what you  may be doing on the other side
•  How waiting on your cow can help you get even with the cow
•  How to stay even, on both sides of the cow and why it’ll help your scores and much more….
Cutting Horse Training Online now features three videos from the clinic available to watch now!

Tell us your favorite nugget of wisdom from Phil Rapp below!


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